Agent-Based Modelling Laboratory

Faculty of Science | York University

The ABM-Lab utilizes advanced information and communications technologies to conduct world-class research and forge strong links between theory and applications. Specific mandates of this lab are:

Develop agent-based modelling computational systems to integrate data and information from various sources and generate new knowledge to address biological, societal, and practical questions.

Implement knowledge translation methodologies to translate the modelling results into the context of public policy to support decision making.

Train a new generation of highly qualified personnel in the rapidly evolving field of agent-based modelling with applications to emerging infectious diseases.

The ABM-Lab is currently conducting several projects related to the modelling of infectious diseases, with particular emphasis on establishing strong links between “Mathematical Epidemiology” and “Theoretical Immunology”. Attempts are made to explore the interplay between pathogen dynamics in host (micro-dynamics) and disease transmission in the population (macro-dynamics). Current projects include the development of large scale computational systems to simulate in-silico populations. Some current projects are:

-- Investigating the effects of heterogeneity and stochasticity in the spread of infectious diseases

-- Evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of intervention measures against community and hospital acquired infections

-- Optimizing vaccination strategies for pandemic influenza

-- Understanding why infectious diseases re-emerge

-- Assessing intervention strategies for vulnerable populations

-- Strategic response planning for emerging infectious diseases

-- Management of drug-resistance in the population using in vivo models

-- Modelling the impact of imperfect and booster vaccination on disease epidemiology

-- Stability analysis and bifurcation behaviour of continuous and discrete dynamical systems

Major supporting organizations for my research include: